Previously, we looked at the basics of lead abatement certification, with an emphasis on the process in the state of California. Today, we will examine the levels of certification in more detail with a list of the prerequisites for certification at each level and a list of definitions for lead abatement activities. This information is derived from the requirements given by the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch.

Inspector Certification requires the completion of 40 hours of a lead abatement assessment course, and one of the following combinations of education and experience: Bachelors degree and one year of lead abatement or related experience; Associates degree and two years of lead abatement or similar experience; or three years experience in lead abatement or a related field.

Project Designer Certification requires completion of 40 hours of a lead abatement construction supervision and project monitoring course, and a combination of education and experience similar to that required for instructor certification. However, project designer certification does not require work experience in lead abatement.

Project Monitor Certification requires the completion of 40 hours of a lead abatement construction supervision and project monitoring course, and one of the following combinations of education and experience: Bachelors degree and one year of lead abatement or related experience; Associates degree and one year of lead abatement or similar experience; two years experience as a certified lead supervisor; or three years experience in lead abatement or a related field.

Supervisor Certification requires the completion of 40 hours of a lead abatement construction supervision and project monitoring course, and one of the following combinations of experience: one year experience as a certified lead worker; or two years experience in lead abatement or a related field.

Worker Certification requires the completion of a 24 hour lead-related work course.

Abatement Planning is the design of a set of measures that will reduce or eliminate lead-based hazards in homes or commercial buildings. Abatement planning can be done by certified project designers, project monitors and supervisors.

Clearance Inspections ensure that proper abatement procedures are being followed on the job site. Clearance inspections may be performed by certified inspectors and project monitors.

Lead Hazard Evaluations determine whether or not a building has lead-based hazards, and if so, how much of a risk the lead-based products pose the residents or visitors of the building. Only a certified inspector can perform a lead hazard evaluation.

Tomorrow, we will look at the fines and fees associated with lead-based hazards and lead abatement.