Spray Applications Knowledge for Facility Managers

June 28, 2012

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Before you take on the task of painting or hiring a professional painter, know what to look for and know upfront what steps the painter is taking to protect the surrounding areas. It is the job of the Facility Manager to make certain things run smoothly, discuss these issues with the painting contractors before the job starts.

The first thing you will need to know is what spray applications will be used, a lot of course will depend on the structure, coating, size and/or shape of the project being painted. The proper spray application will make all the difference. Familiarize yourself with the different spray applications that are out there.

Today there are so many options to choose from: roller, flow coating; airless, conventional air-spray; high-volume/low-pressure sprayers; electrostatic spray; electrodepositing; and even plural component spray and dispensing systems.

These sprayers are only as good as the individual using them, and you will want to feel that the painter doing the work is competent, so don’t be afraid to ask questions. Ask about the expertise level of the individuals using the equipment. Facility Managers will find that hiring well-trained crews helps meet that goal, ensuring a quality spray application.

If you do not know which is the best paint application, then ask an expert, in fact, it is a good idea to get at least two or three opinions or quotes before you hire for the job. Before the work has begun know all your options.

Prior to the job, discuss what steps will be taken to cover windows, bricks, rock or other objects near the area that is to be painted. A few minutes of prep work can save countless hours of clean up afterwards.

Visually scale the area prior to the start of the job, as well as at the conclusion of the job. It takes less time to spot the areas of concern prior to the project starting than to try to access the damages afterwards. So take a few minutes and make certain that windows and plants are covered before the painting begins. Post signs ahead of time alerting staff, employees etc. that the work is being done, so that they can move vehicles, or other objects prior to the onset of the project.

Another thing you want to consider is the weather, if the wind is blowing, it can take the paint from those sprayers and douse the neighborhood. You should know the painting company’s policies in regards to weather conditions. It is better to wait it out, rather than to start painting in the rain and watch all that hard work get washed away.

OSHA guidelines require painters to wear respiratory masks and sometimes even ear plugs, depending on the equipment being used, so if you plan on being anywhere near the project you might want to wear appropriate masks to keep the fumes out of your lungs as well.

Be aware that the products that painters use such as thinners, degreasers, resins, and even dust from sanding, and rust removers are hazardous and if not properly cared for can become a fire or explosion risk. Don’t take anything for granted practice safety.

At the completion of the job, although site cleanup is the responsibility of the contractor, it will come back to bite a facility manager, if it is not done. So, before you sign off on the project carefully inspect the area to make certain that the contractor has removed all debris, materials, trash etc. from the premises and view all work after the project is complete to verify that everything is acceptable and in good condition.

If you notice any items that the painter has overlooked point it out and have them correct it. For the most part your job as the Facility Manager is the most important part; it is up to you to make certain that everything is in order prior to signing off on the job.Before you take on the task of painting or hiring a professional painter, know what to look for and know upfront what steps the painter is taking to protect the surrounding areas. It is the job of the Facility Manager to make certain things run smoothly, discuss these issues with the painting contractors before the job starts.

The first thing you will need to know is what spray applications will be used, a lot of course will depend on the structure, coating, size and/or shape of the project being painted. The proper spray application will make all the difference. Familiarize yourself with the different spray applications that are out there.

Today there are so many options to choose from: roller, flow coating; airless, conventional air-spray; high-volume/low-pressure sprayers; electrostatic spray; electrodepositing; and even plural component spray and dispensing systems.

These sprayers are only as good as the individual using them, and you will want to feel that the painter doing the work is competent, so don’t be afraid to ask questions. Ask about the expertise level of the individuals using the equipment. Facility Managers will find that hiring well-trained crews helps meet that goal, ensuring a quality spray application.

If you do not know which is the best paint application, then ask an expert, in fact, it is a good idea to get at least two or three opinions or quotes before you hire for the job. Before the work has begun know all your options.

Prior to the job, discuss what steps will be taken to cover windows, bricks, rock or other objects near the area that is to be painted. A few minutes of prep work can save countless hours of clean up afterwards.

Visually scale the area prior to the start of the job, as well as at the conclusion of the job. It takes less time to spot the areas of concern prior to the project starting than to try to access the damages afterwards. So take a few minutes and make certain that windows and plants are covered before the painting begins. Post signs ahead of time alerting staff, employees etc. that the work is being done, so that they can move vehicles, or other objects prior to the onset of the project.

Another thing you want to consider is the weather, if the wind is blowing, it can take the paint from those sprayers and douse the neighborhood. You should know the painting company’s policies in regards to weather conditions. It is better to wait it out, rather than to start painting in the rain and watch all that hard work get washed away.

OSHA guidelines require painters to wear respiratory masks and sometimes even ear plugs, depending on the equipment being used, so if you plan on being anywhere near the project you might want to wear appropriate masks to keep the fumes out of your lungs as well.

Be aware that the products that painters use such as thinners, degreasers, resins, and even dust from sanding, and rust removers are hazardous and if not properly cared for can become a fire or explosion risk. Don’t take anything for granted practice safety.

At the completion of the job, although site cleanup is the responsibility of the contractor, it will come back to bite a facility manager, if it is not done. So, before you sign off on the project carefully inspect the area to make certain that the contractor has removed all debris, materials, trash etc. from the premises and view all work after the project is complete to verify that everything is acceptable and in good condition.

If you notice any items that the painter has overlooked point it out and have them correct it. For the most part your job as the Facility Manager is the most important part; it is up to you to make certain that everything is in order prior to signing off on the job.

Before you take on the task of painting or hiring a professional painter, know what to look for and know upfront what steps the painter is taking to protect the surrounding areas. It is the job of the Facility Manager to make certain things run smoothly, discuss these issues with the painting contractors before the job starts.

The first thing you will need to know is what spray applications will be used, a lot of course will depend on the structure, coating, size and/or shape of the project being painted. The proper spray application will make all the difference. Familiarize yourself with the different spray applications that are out there.

Today there are so many options to choose from: roller, flow coating; airless, conventional air-spray; high-volume/low-pressure sprayers; electrostatic spray; electrodepositing; and even plural component spray and dispensing systems.

These sprayers are only as good as the individual using them, and you will want to feel that the painter doing the work is competent, so don’t be afraid to ask questions. Ask about the expertise level of the individuals using the equipment. Facility Managers will find that hiring well-trained crews helps meet that goal, ensuring a quality spray application.

If you do not know which is the best paint application, then ask an expert, in fact, it is a good idea to get at least two or three opinions or quotes before you hire for the job. Before the work has begun know all your options.

Prior to the job, discuss what steps will be taken to cover windows, bricks, rock or other objects near the area that is to be painted. A few minutes of prep work can save countless hours of clean up afterwards.

Visually scale the area prior to the start of the job, as well as at the conclusion of the job. It takes less time to spot the areas of concern prior to the project starting than to try to access the damages afterwards. So take a few minutes and make certain that windows and plants are covered before the painting begins. Post signs ahead of time alerting staff, employees etc. that the work is being done, so that they can move vehicles, or other objects prior to the onset of the project.

Another thing you want to consider is the weather, if the wind is blowing, it can take the paint from those sprayers and douse the neighborhood. You should know the painting company’s policies in regards to weather conditions. It is better to wait it out, rather than to start painting in the rain and watch all that hard work get washed away.

OSHA guidelines require painters to wear respiratory masks and sometimes even ear plugs, depending on the equipment being used, so if you plan on being anywhere near the project you might want to wear appropriate masks to keep the fumes out of your lungs as well.

Be aware that the products that painters use such as thinners, degreasers, resins, and even dust from sanding, and rust removers are hazardous and if not properly cared for can become a fire or explosion risk. Don’t take anything for granted practice safety.

At the completion of the job, although site cleanup is the responsibility of the contractor, it will come back to bite a facility manager, if it is not done. So, before you sign off on the project carefully inspect the area to make certain that the contractor has removed all debris, materials, trash etc. from the premises and view all work after the project is complete to verify that everything is acceptable and in good condition.

If you notice any items that the painter has overlooked point it out and have them correct it. For the most part your job as the Facility Manager is the most important part; it is up to you to make certain that everything is in order prior to signing off on the job.Before you take on the task of painting or hiring a professional painter, know what to look for and know upfront what steps the painter is taking to protect the surrounding areas. It is the job of the Facility Manager to make certain things run smoothly, discuss these issues with the painting contractors before the job starts.

The first thing you will need to know is what spray applications will be used, a lot of course will depend on the structure, coating, size and/or shape of the project being painted. The proper spray application will make all the difference. Familiarize yourself with the different spray applications that are out there.

Today there are so many options to choose from: roller, flow coating; airless, conventional air-spray; high-volume/low-pressure sprayers; electrostatic spray; electrodepositing; and even plural component spray and dispensing systems.

These sprayers are only as good as the individual using them, and you will want to feel that the painter doing the work is competent, so don’t be afraid to ask questions. Ask about the expertise level of the individuals using the equipment. Facility Managers will find that hiring well-trained crews helps meet that goal, ensuring a quality spray application.

If you do not know which is the best paint application, then ask an expert, in fact, it is a good idea to get at least two or three opinions or quotes before you hire for the job. Before the work has begun know all your options.

Prior to the job, discuss what steps will be taken to cover windows, bricks, rock or other objects near the area that is to be painted. A few minutes of prep work can save countless hours of clean up afterwards.

Visually scale the area prior to the start of the job, as well as at the conclusion of the job. It takes less time to spot the areas of concern prior to the project starting than to try to access the damages afterwards. So take a few minutes and make certain that windows and plants are covered before the painting begins. Post signs ahead of time alerting staff, employees etc. that the work is being done, so that they can move vehicles, or other objects prior to the onset of the project.

Another thing you want to consider is the weather, if the wind is blowing, it can take the paint from those sprayers and douse the neighborhood. You should know the painting company’s policies in regards to weather conditions. It is better to wait it out, rather than to start painting in the rain and watch all that hard work get washed away.

OSHA guidelines require painters to wear respiratory masks and sometimes even ear plugs, depending on the equipment being used, so if you plan on being anywhere near the project you might want to wear appropriate masks to keep the fumes out of your lungs as well.

Be aware that the products that painters use such as thinners, degreasers, resins, and even dust from sanding, and rust removers are hazardous and if not properly cared for can become a fire or explosion risk. Don’t take anything for granted practice safety.

At the completion of the job, although site cleanup is the responsibility of the contractor, it will come back to bite a facility manager, if it is not done. So, before you sign off on the project carefully inspect the area to make certain that the contractor has removed all debris, materials, trash etc. from the premises and view all work after the project is complete to verify that everything is acceptable and in good condition.

If you notice any items that the painter has overlooked point it out and have them correct it. For the most part your job as the Facility Manager is the most important part; it is up to you to make certain that everything is in order prior to signing off on the job.

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